The Treasury Section of Fine Arts

This article presents an overview about the Treasury Section of Fine Arts. Let us take a look to know detailed info on Treasury Section of Fine Arts.

In 1934, a new Department was formed which was named as the Treasury Section of Painting & Sculpture, which was later known as the Treasury Section of Fine Arts.

The main work of this department of the Treasury Section of Fine Arts was to supply various federal buildings the work of art. In order to do so funds were arranged and then distributed on a case-by-base basis to chosen facilities, except for a brief period in 1939, when there was a short-lived percent-for-art provision being implemented in the United States of America.

An arrangement was done by the Treasury Section of Fine Arts which involved setting aside one percent amount of the total construction costs for the purpose of buying the artwork and numerous artists from the Treasury Section of Fine Arts were finalized by organizing a competition. The info on Treasury Section of Fine Arts competition was such around 190 competitions were organized and the entries which came as a response of these competition resulted in more than 40,000 sketches by some 15,000 artists. In the end, the Treasury awarded 1,371 commissions.

Talking about Treasury Section of Fine Art’s programs, it launched another such program in the year 1935 which was named as the Treasury Relief Art Program (TRAP). It was granted a fund of $530,000 from the Works Progress Administration. The authorities felt that they could afford to ignore the WPA's requirement, according to which there should be around ninety percent of artists employed with its funds. They ignored this fact and as a result of which the Treasury Section of Fine Arts had to face severe criticism of all New Deal programs from what was then a highly organized and politically conscious community of artists.